Asian Surveying & Mapping
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June 9th, 2010
Mapping the Pacific Ocean

Times have changed and mapping technology has changed considerably. Google Ocean is an example of that change. Users can move through a wide variety of data and topography around the Pacific Ocean using this tool.

The Pacific Tsunami Centre operated by NOAA is situated in Hawaii and provides up-to-date information about potential dangers arising from the ocean due to earthquakes causing tsunami. Included are several maps and data about the ocean.

Meanwhile, SOPAC has been providing maps and data for the Pacific region. This includes recent work on cyclones causing high waves.

China set out to map about 1 million hectares of the ocean off it’s coast in 2006 – with no less than 3000 surveyors it was said. That work was expected to take up to 3 years and was expected to be the forerunner for further development.

Global Navigation Satellite System signals Reflectometry (GNSS-R) is expected to play a larger role in ocean survying. A new ESRI book ‘Ocean Globe’ also explores the use of ocean mapping technologies.

Technology has changed over time. Today we have more kinds of technologies that are capable of measuring and monitoring the Pacific Ocean, hopefully this leads us toward understanding it better and conserving it for generations into the future.