Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
The GIS Centre in Dubai Municipality develops system for classifying Dubai assets
Dubai: The GIS (global information systems) Centre in Dubai...
World Bank : In Bangladesh, drone and GIS mapping tools come to the aid of designing disaster shelters during COVID-19
Due to the COVID-19 shutdown, the project team could...
Djibouti is Launching its Space Program with Two Satellites
The African space scene is ever-increasing in both capacity...
UAE: Space-as-a-service business model on the rise, say experts
The market demand for a ‘space-as-a-service’ business model is...
Israel to halt nighttime ‘mapping’ of Palestinian homes
JERUSALEM (AP) — The Israeli military says it is...
India’s New Geospatial Data Policy Is A Game Changer: Agendra Kumar, Esri
Esri India is a global leader in end-to-end Geographic...
Egypt to attend Europe-Africa Space Earth Observation Forum
Egypt’s Minister of Higher Education and Scientific Research Khaled...
Shenzhen offers support to boost satellite sector in Chinese city
HELSINKI — Shenzhen will provide up to $47 million...
Indian Scientists Develop New Technique That Can Detect Tropical Cyclones Earlier than Satellites
Indian scientists have found a promising technique for early...
ISRO Offers Free Short-term Online Courses in Machine Learning, GIS Technology
The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) is currently inviting applications for...

April 30th, 2019
Visiting a Young Island

image

On Oct. 8, 2018, Dan Slayback of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., joined scientists and students with the Sea Education Association’s SEA Semester South Pacific cruise to visit a three-year-old island he’d only seen from space.

“There’s no map of the new land,” Slayback said. It erupted from the rim of an underwater caldera in early 2015, nestled between two older islands. The new Tongan island is one of only three that has erupted in the last 150 years that have survived the ocean’s eroding waves longer than a few months.

The three-year-old volcanic island (center) as seen from the SEA drone. (Credit: Sea Education Association/SEA Semester)

Slayback and his colleagues Jim Garvin at Goddard and Vicki Ferrini at Columbia University have been watching it from satellites since its birth, trying to make a 3D model of its shape and volume as it changes over time to understand how much material has been eroded and what it is made of that makes it partially resistant to erosion. But while high-resolution satellite observations are revolutionary for studying remote regions, they can only tell you so much without actually visiting the place on the ground.