Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
Synspective Succeeds in Acquiring Japan’s Highest Resolution 25cm SAR image
TOKYO, 2024 – Synspective Inc., a provider of Synthetic...
Why Indian-origin astronaut Sunita Williams is stuck in space
The Starliner mission is seen as a landmark for...
China Successfully Launches Tianhui 5-02 Remote Sensing Satellite
China has successfully launched the Tianhui 5-02 Earth remote...
ISRO to organise hackathon to celebrate first National Space Day on Aug 23
BENGALURU: For the first National Space Day, which will...
Japan launches Earth observation satellite on new flagship H3 rocket
TOKYO, Japan: Japan successfully launched an upgraded Earth observation...
China fortifies Tiangong space station after Russian satellite explosion
Two Shenzhou-18 astronauts completed a spacewalk on Wednesday night to...
Unveiling East Asia’s urban landscape: A massive mapping project illuminates 280 million buildings
Accurate and comprehensive building data is critical for urban...
Japan successfully launches an advanced Earth observation satellite on its new flagship H3 rocket
Japan has successfully deployed an upgraded Earth observation satellite...
Synspective Secures 7 Billion Yen in Series C Funding
TOKYO, 2024, June 20th – Synspective Inc., a Synthetic...
South Korea launches its own NASA
Determined to join the ranks of global space powers,...

In March 2011, the Great Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami devastated the Pacific Coast of Japan; however, the tsunami also had global implications. When water from the 40-meter waves that pounded the coastline finally receded, a lot of debris from the island was carried out to sea. This debris, ranging from beach docks to boats to small flotation devices, started washing up on the shores of the Pacific Northwest in the United States in 2012, bringing with it fouling foreign marine algae that posed a major invasive threat to the U.S. coastline.

In the current issue of Phycologia, researchers from Oregon State University, United States, and Kobe University, Japan, detail the collection, examination and classification of these foreign marine algae from their first appearance in 2012 through 2016 when the debris appeared to have subsided. The main goal of the research was to assess the algae and determine whether it posed an invasive threat to the North American coastline.

As the debris settled on beaches, the researchers, with the enlisted help of state workers, volunteers and other scientists, worked to collect samples of the attached algae. Overall, more than 500 samples were collected from 42 pieces of debris. Once collected and delivered, the samples were immediately examined and cataloged. Each sample was meticulously evaluated for the following characteristics: taxonomy, life history (including longevity and successional type), global distribution, size, how many times it appeared on different debris, at-sea survival and Northeast Pacific occurrence both pre- and post-tsunami.