Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
Egyptian Intelligence Issues Order Banning Ministers from Appearing on Air Until Further Notice
Senior officials in the General Intelligence Services (GIS) have...
South Korea-based Short Range Air Defense Battery Integrates Counter-UAS into Core Competencies
Amid the looming threat of surveillance by Unmanned Aerial...
Drone Maps Icy Lava Tube in Iceland in Preparation for Cave Exploration on the Moon and Mars
The SETI Institute and Astrobotic Technology, Inc. are announcing...
Israel Aerospace Industries Unveils ADA-O to Enable Land Platforms to Deal With GNSS Anti-Jammers
Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) is introducing ADA-O, an additional...
Kazakhstan suggests Central Asian nations to launch 5 earth remote sensing satellites
Kazakhstan suggests the Central Asian nations to create a...
China to fly solar drone to near space
Competition among drone makers in China is heating up,...
Drones to undertake India’s ‘biggest’ land survey exercise
Maharashtra State will use drones to undertake the “biggest”...
Uzbekistan may work on common space project with Central Asian countries
Kazakhstan presented the space project to the heads of...
EU unveils Earth observation program
The European Union’s (EU) Earth observation program, which can...
European Union brings Copernicus Programme to Philippines
THE European Union Delegation to the Philippines last March...
  • Nov 6, 2018
  • Comments Off on Japanese Tsunami Sends Invasive Debris and Marine Algae to U.S. Pacific Northwest Coast
  • Feature
  • 241 Views

In March 2011, the Great Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami devastated the Pacific Coast of Japan; however, the tsunami also had global implications. When water from the 40-meter waves that pounded the coastline finally receded, a lot of debris from the island was carried out to sea. This debris, ranging from beach docks to boats to small flotation devices, started washing up on the shores of the Pacific Northwest in the United States in 2012, bringing with it fouling foreign marine algae that posed a major invasive threat to the U.S. coastline.

In the current issue of Phycologia, researchers from Oregon State University, United States, and Kobe University, Japan, detail the collection, examination and classification of these foreign marine algae from their first appearance in 2012 through 2016 when the debris appeared to have subsided. The main goal of the research was to assess the algae and determine whether it posed an invasive threat to the North American coastline.

As the debris settled on beaches, the researchers, with the enlisted help of state workers, volunteers and other scientists, worked to collect samples of the attached algae. Overall, more than 500 samples were collected from 42 pieces of debris. Once collected and delivered, the samples were immediately examined and cataloged. Each sample was meticulously evaluated for the following characteristics: taxonomy, life history (including longevity and successional type), global distribution, size, how many times it appeared on different debris, at-sea survival and Northeast Pacific occurrence both pre- and post-tsunami.