Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
Russian Scientists to Set Up Space Observation Posts in Arctic by 2020
MOSCOW - Russian scientists intend to set up a...
Soyuz Launches European Weather Satellite
WASHINGTON — A Soyuz rocket successfully launched a European...
China-France Oceanography Satellite to Assist with Disaster Management
China and France launched a new joint Earth observation...
Countdown to the 1st GMES & Africa forum in Gabon
The African Union Commission is Organizing the 1st forum...
Harnessing Earth-observation data for practical healthcare applications
The EU-funded AURORA project will develop technologies to turn...
HOT Indonesia Completed Mapping Lifeline Infrastructures in Semarang
Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team has completed mapping Semarang, the capital...
Israel to provide EU unmanned maritime patrol system in 68 mln USD deal
JERUSALEM - Israel's Elbit Systems will operate its flagship...
Japan launches greenhouse gas observing satellite
Japan has launched a new satellite to observe greenhouse...
Philippine-made Diwata-2B goes into orbit with KhalifaSat
Just as the UAE rejoiced when the first 100-per...
Japan’s NTT & Furuno Electric develop GNSS receiver for severe reception conditions
Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT) and Furuno Electric...

Analysts peering at satellite images of North Korea after its latest nuclear test spotted many landslides and wide disturbances at the country’s test site. Tunnels for the nuclear blasts are deep inside Mount Mantap, a mile-high peak.

“These disturbances are more numerous and widespread than what we have seen from any of the five tests North Korea previously conducted,” three experts wrote in an analysis for 38 North, a website run by the U.S.-Korea Institute of the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.

Early readings from global networks that monitor shock waves suggest that the nuclear blast had a destructive power equal to 120,000 tons of high explosives. If correct, that’s roughly six times more powerful than North Korea’s test of September 2016, and eight times larger than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima in 1945.

The new satellite images of the Punggye-ri nuclear test site were taken the day after the nuclear detonation. Planet, a company in San Francisco that owns swarms of tiny satellites, reconnoitered the secretive nuclear test site.

Satellite images show Mount Mantap on Sept. 1, 2017, and Sept. 4, 2017, before and after North Korea’s latest nuclear test deep under the mountain. (Credit: Planet)

Click here for more information.