Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
China Confirms Reception of Data from Gaofen-5 Satellite
The Chinese Academy of Sciences confirmed that one of...
India’s ISRO To Take On SpaceX With Its Own Smart and Reusable Rockets
India’s premier space agency Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO)...
Satellite Data Archives Reveal Unrecorded Himalayan Floods
Almost 30 years’ worth of Landsat observations created a...
Supreme Court Directs Delhi Government To Buy Remote-Sensing Machines To Detect Pollution
The Supreme Court on Thursday asked the Delhi government...
Australian Government Announces Space Budget for Agency, PNT, and Earth Observation
The Australian government has announced inaugural seed funding of...
China Launches New Earth Observation Satellite for Environmental Monitoring
China on Wednesday launched Gaofen-5, a hyperspectral imaging satellite,...
Indian Geospatial Economy Value at INR 20,629 cr or $3.07 Billion
The Indian geospatial economy value is INR 20,629 crore...
North Korea’s Last Nuclear Test Changed The Height of an Entire Mountain
An underground test of what was claimed by North...
NASA Completes Survey Flights to Map Arctic Ice
Operation IceBridge, NASA's longest-running airborne mission to monitor polar...
Indian Railways to Begin Land Surveying on the Worlds Highest Rail Line
The Indian railway has set a target of completing...

On Dec. 28, 2016, China launched a pair of high-resolution remote-sensing satellites from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Centre in Shanxi Province, state-run Xinhua news agency reported. The satellites, SuperView-1 01/02, were launched on a Long March 2D rocket, and they’re able to provide commercial images at 0.5-meter resolution.

The satellites’ launch followed release of a white paper noting that by 2020 China plans to form a BeiDou network consisting of 35 satellites for global navigation services to compete with the U.S. GPS. According to the paper, China plans to provide basic services to countries along the Silk Road Economic Belt and 21st-century Maritime Silk Road in 2018.

Click here for more information.

UPDATE:

Two commercial Earth-imaging satellites launched by a Chinese Long March 2D booster Wednesday are flying in lower-than-planned orbits after an apparent rocket mishap, according to tracking data published by the U.S. military.

The two SuperView 1, or Gaojing 1, satellites are flying in egg-shaped orbits ranging from 133 miles (214 kilometers) to 325 miles (524 kilometers) in altitude at an inclination of 97.6 degrees.

The satellites would likely re-enter Earth’s atmosphere within months in such a low orbit, and it was unclear late Wednesday whether the craft had enough propellant to raise their altitudes.

Click here for more information on the latest news.

Two SuperView-1 high-resolution remote-sensing satellites were launched in late 2016 from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Centre in Shanxi Province. (Credit: AP)