Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
China sends new remote-sensing satellite in space
China has sent a new remote-sensing satellite into space,...
Launch of Russia’s Aist-2T remote-sensing satellites scheduled for 2022
SAMARA -  The Progress Space Rocket Center plans to...
India’s first satellite of 2020 Gsat-30 successfully launched
In the first mission of the year for the...
Egypt signs a bilateral space cooperation agreement with France
The Egyptian Space Agency has signed a bilateral space...
Two Iranian Remote-Sensing Satellites Ready for Launch
The University of Science and Technology handed over two...
Grab to launch geo-mapping services in Indonesia this year amid EV push
Southeast Asian ride-sharing firm Grab is targeting to launch...
Japan To Launch Electro-Optical IGS Reconnaissance Satellite In January 2020
Japanese satellite and space industry giant Mitsubishi Heavy Industries...
TomTom closes deal with Huawei for use of maps and services
AMSTERDAM (Reuters) - Dutch navigation and digital mapping company...
Terra Drone group company KazUAV supports World Bank’s school infrastructure risk assessment initiative in Kyrgyzstan
KazUAV is leveraging 3D mapping drones to help the...
Aerometrex Soars Higher with New 3D Models
Aerial mapper Aerometrex has released two new services for...

June 10th, 2010
Resource Mapping of East China Sea Remains Tense

The Japanese government aims to establish a “crisis management” agreement to resolve any incidents. Chinese Premier Wen has agreed to open negotiations with Japan regarding natural gas fields, and the two countries both seek to solidify and resolve a 2008 bilateral agreement.

Both countries rely on natural gas for home heating and cooking, and both seek to find sources closer to home than the resource-rich far-Middle East. Similar disputes and tensions are taking place throughout the world as energy sources become more scarce, and as sea-bed resources are exploited. The Arctic is one such area where sea-bed mapping efforts are ongoing in earnest, with all Arctic countries vying for these rich resources.

As is witnessed by the catastrophic oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, these activities can result in widespread environmental damage. Given the technical hurdles, and the potential impacts, there are a number of international conventions in place to deal with such contingencies. As these energy sources become more scarce, there will likely be further pressures on international relations. Resources
US and China Can’t Calm South China Sea, Asia Times, June, 4, 2010
The Future of Japan-China Relations, Forbes.com, June 8, 2010