Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
India to Launch Two Space Missions Every Month Over the Next 16 Months: ISRO
India is ready to launch two space missions every...
Israel Likely to Beat India in Moon Mission Race as Chandrayaan-2 Launch Postponed for Next Year
India's ambitious lunar probe mission, Chandrayaan-2, has hit another...
Genesys Joins Wipro to Put India on Global Autonomous Driving Map
In an effort to put India on the global...
SA Space Agency Wants To Develop Space Startups
The South African National Space Agency (SANSA) & DigitalGlobe...
B-Nest and Esri India Collaborate to Provide GIS Platform for Madhya Pradesh Startups
B-Nest, a venture of Bhopal Smart City Development Corporation...
SANSA And DigitalGlobe Launch South Africa Earth Observation Challenge
The South African National Space Agency (SANSA) is teaming...
Satellite Built by Maxar Technologies’ SSL for Indonesia’s Largest Telecom Company is Performing Post-Launch Maneuvers According to Plan
PALO ALTO, CA - SSL, a Maxar Technologies company (formerly...
Landspace of China to Launch First Rocket in Q4 2018
HELSINKI — Emerging private Chinese company Landspace is set...
Azerbaijan to Lunch Another Satellite this Autumn
The launch of Azerspace-2/Intelsat 38, the second geostationary satellite...
18 Finnish-Polish observation satellites will quickly detect natural disasters anywhere
During 2018, the first Finnish-Polish observation satellite will be...

August 9th, 2018
Airbus-built Aeolus Satellite Ready to Take on the Wind

Stevenage/Kourou, 09/08/2018 – Aeolus, the European Space Agency’s wind sensing satellite, has been encapsulated into the Vega launcher at the Guiana Space Centre in Kourou ready for launch on the 21 August.

Built by Airbus, Aeolus will be the first satellite capable of performing global wind-component-profile observation on a daily basis in near real-time.

The 1.4-tonne spacecraft, features the LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) instrument called Aladin, which uses the Doppler effect to determine the wind speed at varying altitudes.

The data from Aeolus will provide reliable wind-profile data on a global scale and is needed by meteorologists to further improve the accuracy of weather forecasts and by climatologists to better understand the global dynamics of Earth’s atmosphere.

Aeolus will orbit the Earth 15 times a day with data delivery to users within 120 minutes of the oldest measurement in each orbit. The orbit repeat cycle is 7 days (every 111 orbits) and the spacecraft will fly in a 320 km orbit and have a lifetime of three years.