Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
Australian Space Agency funds development of aerospace-grade GNSS receiver
The Australian Space Agency has funded the development of...
Continuity risks for Australian EO data access
A new report details the widespread use of Earth...
China launches new remote sensing satellite
JIUQUAN, April 15 (Xinhua) -- China on Monday launched...
7.4-Magnitude Earthquake Strikes Taiwan
A major, 7.4-magnitude earthquake struck the eastern coast of...
Tata Deploys Its Geospatial Satellite In Space on Space X’s Falcon 9 Rocket
THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: Tata Company launched India's first private commercial satellite...
Taiwan’s Formosat-8 Satellite Set for Launch by 2025
The Taiwan Space Agency has announced progress on the...
Iranian Scientists to Build Satellite Constellation for 2 Simultaneous Missions
The scientists at the knowledge-based company had previously succeeded...
China provides geospatial intel and other military support to Russia, US says
The US has warned its European allies that China...
Japanese lunar lander company ispace raises $53.5 million in stock sale
WASHINGTON — Japanese lunar lander developer has raised $53.5...
Esri and Prince Sultan University Advance GIS Education Through Strategic Partnership
Memorandum of Understanding with Institution Enhances GIS Curriculum and...

Surigae is not expected to make landfall, but the typhoon churning in the Western Pacific Ocean is already a significant storm. When the storm rapidly intensified to category 5 strength on April 17, 2021, it marked the earliest date in the year that any storm in the Northern Hemisphere had reached such intensity in modern record-keeping.

Surigae (known as Bising in the Philippines) is the first typhoon of the 2021 season in the northwest Pacific and the second named storm. According to the U.S. Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC), the super typhoon reached sustained winds of 165 knots (190 miles/305 kilometers per hour) in the early afternoon on April 17. According to the Japan Meteorological Agency, the central pressure inside the storm dropped to 895 millibars, one of the lowest readings ever recorded.

The infrared satellite image above was acquired around midday on April 19 with the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on NOAA-20. Surigae’s clouds are shown using brightness temperature data, which is useful for distinguishing cooler cloud structures from the warmer surface below. Around that time the JTWC reported the typhoon had sustained winds of 120 knots (140 miles/220 kilometers per hour).

The typhoon is expected to curve and stay offshore, but its outer bands have been lashing the central and northern Philippine islands with heavy rain, gusty winds, and coastal flooding. At least one person has died and nearly 100,000 have evacuated coastal areas.

Image Credit: NASA Earth Observatory images by Joshua Stevens, using VIIRS data from NASA EOSDIS LANCE, GIBS/Worldview, the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership, and the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS).