Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
Ouster Expands to Japan and South Korea to Support Growing Demand for High-Resolution Digital Lidar Sensors
SAN FRANCISCO - Ouster, Inc. (NYSE: OUST) (“Ouster” or...
New Zealand’s Counties Energy Partners with GE Digital for its Digital Utility Transformation
GE Digital today announced that Counties Energy, an electricity distribution network...
The Hong Kong Institute of Surveyors: Best Development & Conservation Award 2021 Surveying Excellence in Development and Conservation
HONG KONG SAR  - The results of HKIS Best...
India, Japan researchers working on smartphone-based mapping of cracks, potholes in roads
The joint project is aimed at developing an affordable...
Dubai Airshow 2021: Israeli companies offer space systems, UAVs to the Middle East
UAVs and new communications and Earth observation satellites were...
Space company Success Rockets presented the demonstrator model of the first Russian specialized satellite for monitoring the main climate-active substances “DIANA” at the 26th UN Climate Conference in Glasgow
Russian private space company Success Rockets is developing a...
Intermap Expands Support of TATA Communications Across Major Indian Cities
DENVER,- Intermap Technologies (TSX: IMP) (OTCQX: ITMSF) ("Intermap" or...
European Space Agency launches new mission to measure climate change in unprecedented detail
The European Space Agency (ESA) has new plans to...
Israeli startup to collaborate with EXL in providing property intelligence images for insurance carriers
Strategic partnership will bring together aerial imagery, advanced analytics,...
China Launches Three New Remote Sensing Satellites Into Space
The satellite launch marked the 396th mission for the...

The satellite tracking is helping researchers map floating algae as it suffocates vital food plants in one of Australia’s most important bird habitats.

Filamentous algae are decimating aquatic plants in the southern Coorong as it blocks seeding and germination, according to project leader Professor Michelle Waycott.

The plants include Ruppia tuberosa, also known as widgeon grass, one of the most important food sources for birds in the internationally renowned RAMSAR-listed refuge at the southern end of the Murray Darling Basin in South Australia.

“I wouldn’t normally do this kind of work as head of the herbarium in Adelaide, but I felt I could make a difference, I feel we have a small window of opportunity to make a difference,” Waycott said.

The Drivers and Controls of Filamentous Algae and Aquatic Plants project is investigating ways to track and then control the algae. It draws in the University of Adelaide’s remote-sensing team in designing the new method to detect and map floating algae through satellite imagery.

Waycott, who is a professor and chief botanist at the University of Adelaide and the State Herbarium of South Australia, said the team was looking at older Landsat imagery from the Coorong stretching back to the 1980s.

“And we did the assessment last year (using satellites) and finished the work in November and December, and from that we have established a method to trial this year in late spring, early summer,” she said.

“If this works the way we think it will, this year we can use the data to go back through time and reassess how quickly these algal blooms have occurred.”

Research already shows falling numbers of waterbirds, particularly fairy tern and migratory shorebirds, in the Coorong region that is considered the Murray Darling basin’s most important refuge for waterbirds.