Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
UAE celebrates 11th launch anniversary of DubaiSat-1
The UAE is celebrating the 11th anniversary of the...
UAE starts rush of missions to Mars looking for signs of life
A United Arab Emirates spacecraft has rocketed into space...
Turkey’s Lake Salda may yield answers for life on Mars
Similarities between a lake in southwestern Turkey and the...
Nepal set to send new map to UN, others
NEW DELHI: After having issued a new map showing...
ISRO Launches Free Online Course On ‘Remote Sensing’ For Students, Professionals
The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) through its centre,...
European Sentinel satellites to map global CO2 emissions
German manufacturer OHB-System has signed a €445m (£400m) contract...
United Launch Alliance Atlas V Successfully Launches Mars 2020 Mission for NASA
A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket carrying...
Mobile Mapping Market to witness steady growth of 17% during 2020-2026
According to a recent study from market research firm...
First Responder Technologies and Falcon Eye Drones Sign an Exclusive Distribution Agreement for UAE and Wider GCC
VANCOUVER, BC - First Responder Technologies Inc. ("First Responder" or the...
Terra Drone Indonesia Obtained the First Commercial BVLOS Permit in Indonesia
Jakarta, July 20, 2020 - Terra Drone Indonesia once...

China’s first polar-observation satellite has completed its Antarctic observation mission after orbiting Earth for six months.

Since it was launched on Sept. 12, 2019, the satellite called “Ice Pathfinder” (Code: BNU-1) has sent back more than 1,000 images covering the south polar region, according to a statement by its operation team.

It has observed two vast ice collapses on the continent, one occurring on the Amery Ice Shelf on Sept. 25, 2019, and the other on the Pine Island Glacier in February 2020. The satellite has provided continuous monitoring of these ice-calving events, obtaining key satellite imagery and data, said operation team leader Chen Zhuoqi, also an associate professor of the School of Geospatial Engineering and Science under Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou.

Scientists of the satellite project have participated in the country’s ongoing 36th Antarctic expedition. Apart from data acquisition of ground features near research base Zhongshan Station, they also used drone technology to perform remote-sensing research to support “satellite-drone-ground” synchronous scientific experiments in the Antarctic.

Click here for more information.

Image Credit: VCG