Asian Surveying & Mapping
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Japan’s Terra Drone gains footing in Central Asia with investment in leading Kazakh drone company KazUAV
Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan – July 18, 2019 – Japan-based Terra...
ISRO calls off Chandrayaan 2 launch due to technical glitch
India’s ambitious second lunar mission, Chandrayaan 2, suffered a...
Ministry of Interior wins global excellence award in GIS
Doha: The Ministry of the Interior, represented by the...
UAE military satellite lost in Vega launch failure
A European Vega launcher failed Wednesday night around two...
Russia Launches Telescope Into Space To Map The Cosmos In ‘Outstanding’ Detail
Russia has successfully launched a new telescope into space, marking...
UAE’s space programme: ‘UAE to come back stronger with the launch of Falcon Eye 2 soon’
Dubai: The loss of the Falcon Eye 1 satellite...
France announces Air and Space Force, due to launch in 2020
French President, Emmanuel Macron, has announced that the country's...
Russians come calling: ISRO and Russian Space Corporation to work together
Ahead of the launch of Chandrayaan-2 on July 14-15,...
China set to carry out controlled deorbiting of Tiangong-2 space lab
HELSINKI — China appears set to deorbit its Tiangong-2...
Terra Drone Eyes Middle East Market with New Joint Venture to Provide UAV Solutions for Survey Activities
Terra Drone sets up joint venture with NDTCCS, the...

An El Niño that began to form last fall has matured and is now fully entrenched across the Pacific Ocean. Changes in sea surface temperatures (SSTs) brought about by an El Niño affect the atmosphere, resulting in distinctive changes in the rainfall pattern across the Pacific Basin. These changes show up as anomalies or deviations in NASA’s analysis of climatological rainfall.

In a typical El Niño, warmer than average SSTs off the coast of Peru lead to enhanced convection (rising air that condenses and forms clouds and storms) and above-average rainfall in the eastern Pacific near to the Equator, and lower-than-average rainfall over the western Pacific.

However, recent estimates of monthly average rainfall and corresponding rainfall anomalies show heavy rain and above-average rainfall located across the Equatorial Central Pacific, not the eastern Pacific. This is known as El Niño “Modoki” (Japanese for “a similar but different thing”) or a Central Pacific El Niño, wherein enhanced SSTs and rainfall occur near the dateline and not near the coast of Peru.