Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
This dashboard uses GIS to track COVID-19 cases in real-time
Coronavirus cases have seen a significant jump in India...
Satellite animation shows air pollution in China and Italy clearing amid coronavirus lockdowns
In countries and regions that have been under strict...
ISRO has planned a total of 36 missions for 2020-21
2020 and 2021, these two years are going to...
UAE’s student-built climate observation satellite to launch this summer
The UAE will be launching a student-built nanosatellite that...
Space to grow global defence
Global defence company Nova Group is maintaining its projections...
Exolaunch to deliver UAE Space Agency’s small satellite into orbit on Soyuz-2
Berlin-based Exolaunch has told SpaceDaily that the launch of...
Toyota taps startup Momenta to build HD road maps in China
HONG KONG -- Toyota Motor has teamed up with...
Economic lockdown ‘reduces global pollution levels’ – European Space Agency
The lockdown aimed at combating the spread of COVID-19...
A ‘travel log’ of the times in South Korea: Mapping the movements of coronavirus carriers
SEOUL — The novel coronavirus outbreak has produced at...
China’s polar-observation satellite completes Antarctic mission
China's first polar-observation satellite has completed its Antarctic observation...

An El Niño that began to form last fall has matured and is now fully entrenched across the Pacific Ocean. Changes in sea surface temperatures (SSTs) brought about by an El Niño affect the atmosphere, resulting in distinctive changes in the rainfall pattern across the Pacific Basin. These changes show up as anomalies or deviations in NASA’s analysis of climatological rainfall.

In a typical El Niño, warmer than average SSTs off the coast of Peru lead to enhanced convection (rising air that condenses and forms clouds and storms) and above-average rainfall in the eastern Pacific near to the Equator, and lower-than-average rainfall over the western Pacific.

However, recent estimates of monthly average rainfall and corresponding rainfall anomalies show heavy rain and above-average rainfall located across the Equatorial Central Pacific, not the eastern Pacific. This is known as El Niño “Modoki” (Japanese for “a similar but different thing”) or a Central Pacific El Niño, wherein enhanced SSTs and rainfall occur near the dateline and not near the coast of Peru.