Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
Kazakhstan suggests Central Asian nations to launch 5 earth remote sensing satellites
Kazakhstan suggests the Central Asian nations to create a...
China to fly solar drone to near space
Competition among drone makers in China is heating up,...
Drones to undertake India’s ‘biggest’ land survey exercise
Maharashtra State will use drones to undertake the “biggest”...
Uzbekistan may work on common space project with Central Asian countries
Kazakhstan presented the space project to the heads of...
EU unveils Earth observation program
The European Union’s (EU) Earth observation program, which can...
European Union brings Copernicus Programme to Philippines
THE European Union Delegation to the Philippines last March...
Drones retain their buzz at Japanese trade show, with industrial uses expected to bolster growth
CHIBA - With the market for business-use unmanned aircraft...
China GEO supports Brazil dam collapse disaster response
Following the devastating January 2019 Brazilian dam collapse, Chinese...
ISRO’s big achievement: South American countries look towards India for low cost satellite launches
Experts have indicated to Financial Express Online that in...
Malaysian Space Agency created to maximize efficiency and impact
WHILE speculation was hot in the early stages of...

The world is literally a greener place than it was 20 years ago, and data from NASA satellites revealed a counterintuitive source for much of this new foliage: China and India. A new study shows that the two emerging countries with the world’s biggest populations are leading the increase in greening on land. The effect stems mainly from ambitious tree-planting programs in China and intensive agriculture in both countries.

The greening phenomenon was first detected using satellite data in the mid-1990s by Ranga Myneni of Boston University and colleagues, but they did not know whether human activity was one of its chief, direct causes. This new insight was made possible by a nearly 20-year-long data record from a NASA instrument orbiting the Earth on two satellites. It’s called the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS, and its high-resolution data provides very accurate information, helping researchers work out details of what’s happening with Earth’s vegetation, down to the level of 500 meters, or about 1,600 feet, on the ground.

Image Credit: NASA Earth Observatory