Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
CHC Navigation’s GNSS receivers reach the Everest Peak
Shanghai, China - May 27, 2020 - CHC Navigation...
Government wants to launch a satellite to help South African students study remotely
As the country’s universities prepare for the move towards...
Mapping the history of Kalapani dispute between India and Nepal
As Nepal unveiled a new map of its territories...
Ordnance Survey to create the Ordnance Survey of Dubai
Ordnance Survey has entered a contract to work with...
Scotland joins the Public Sector Geospatial Agreement
The first collective geospatial agreement for Great Britain allowing...
ISRO facilities to open for startups, private firms; new geospatial policy soon
The government will allow private firms and startups to...
Myanmar To Build Two Earth Observation Satellites With Japanese Assistance
Myanmar is to build and launch a small Earth...
New base map for Maltese islands launched
The Planning Authority has launched a new base map...
Airbus supplies EU with satellite communications
Paris, 12 May 2020 – Airbus has won the...
Britain’s £5 billion rival to EU’s Galileo satellite project faces scrap
Plans for Britain to join the space race with...

Advances in spatial technology that enable digital agriculture, including a next-generation national positioning system and real-time monitoring of soil moisture levels from space, will take center stage in April 2017 at the International Symposium on Digital Earth & Locate17 in Sydney, Australia.

A new national positioning system accurate to between 2-10 centimeters—as opposed to 5 meters with today’s satellite-based GPS—will boost Australia’s economy by $73 billion or more during the next 20 years, much of it in agriculture, said Dr. Peter Woodgate, CEO of the Cooperative Research Centre for Spatial Information (CRCSI).

“To adopt techniques like precision agriculture and controlled traffic farming, farmers need to be able to position equipment and sensors with about 5-centimeter accuracy,” noted Woodgate. “The conference will showcase space-based augmentation systems—including Australia and New Zealand’s joint initiative—which, subject to testing, are well on the way to achieving that.”

“Leveraging other regional efforts, such as a Japanese satellite-based system recently trialled in Queensland, it will be possible to remotely control unmanned autonomous vehicles like driverless tractors from space,” he added.

 

Next generation GPS, driverless tractors and the Internet of Things are expected to enable massive agriculture productivity growth and business opportunities.