Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
Terra Drone group company KazUAV supports World Bank’s school infrastructure risk assessment initiative in Kyrgyzstan
KazUAV is leveraging 3D mapping drones to help the...
Aerometrex Soars Higher with New 3D Models
Aerial mapper Aerometrex has released two new services for...
thinkWhere Announces 2020 Training Calendar
Stirling, Scotland – thinkWhere, a specialist in open source...
India to Put Humanoid Robot in Space by End-2020: ISRO
A humanoid robot will be ISRO’s first ‘astronaut’ in...
South Korea’s Chollian-2B Environmental Satellite To Launch In February 2020
South Korean environmental monitoring and oceanographic satellite Chollian-2B is...
Australian Bushfires: Mapping Population Dynamics
Massive wildfires have burned over 15 million acres of...
CDA, Survey of Pakistan to digitise capital’s land records
ISLAMABAD: To digitise land record system of the federal capital,...
UK Creates Virtual Satellite Data Centre In Fight Against Climate Change
UK Ministers announced on 30 December 2019 backing for...
South Korea’s KAI To Build Three Remote Sensing Satellites By 2025
South Korean news agency Yonhap reported on 31 December...
AMAP selects HERE as global provider of map and traffic data
Beijing – AMAP, China’s leading mapping, navigation and location-based services provider has selected...

Advances in spatial technology that enable digital agriculture, including a next-generation national positioning system and real-time monitoring of soil moisture levels from space, will take center stage in April 2017 at the International Symposium on Digital Earth & Locate17 in Sydney, Australia.

A new national positioning system accurate to between 2-10 centimeters—as opposed to 5 meters with today’s satellite-based GPS—will boost Australia’s economy by $73 billion or more during the next 20 years, much of it in agriculture, said Dr. Peter Woodgate, CEO of the Cooperative Research Centre for Spatial Information (CRCSI).

“To adopt techniques like precision agriculture and controlled traffic farming, farmers need to be able to position equipment and sensors with about 5-centimeter accuracy,” noted Woodgate. “The conference will showcase space-based augmentation systems—including Australia and New Zealand’s joint initiative—which, subject to testing, are well on the way to achieving that.”

“Leveraging other regional efforts, such as a Japanese satellite-based system recently trialled in Queensland, it will be possible to remotely control unmanned autonomous vehicles like driverless tractors from space,” he added.

 

Next generation GPS, driverless tractors and the Internet of Things are expected to enable massive agriculture productivity growth and business opportunities.