Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
China to Enhance International Space Cooperation
BEIJING - China will promote aerospace development, strengthen international...
Alteryx Expands APAC Presence to Amplify Analytics in Japan
TOKYO and IRVINE, Calif.- Alteryx, Inc. (NYSE: AYX), revolutionizing business...
UAE MoID IT Director Hessa Al Suwaidi on building the foundations for AI
The Ministry of Infrastructure Development is tasked with building...
In a first, US Appoints Indian to Advice it on Earth-Observation and Remote-Sensing Policies
India’s growing might in earth observation, remote sensing, mapping,...
Satellite Research Centre Launched to Advance Australian Space Industry
The Australian space industry has received a $245m injection...
U.K. launches $2.5M contest for tech to counter threats from rogue drones
A range of systems already exists to prevent drones...
Innovative Kiwis win big at Asia-Pacific location data and mapping awards
New Zealanders’ commitment to supporting women in the spatial...
China GEO supports Iran flood disaster response
Record rainfall and flooding in Iran has led to...
UK’s DASA unveils £2m competition to foster counter-UAS technology
The UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) has launched a...
New Japanese Partnership in Space Business
SKY Perfect JSAT has reached a business partnership agreement...

Advances in spatial technology that enable digital agriculture, including a next-generation national positioning system and real-time monitoring of soil moisture levels from space, will take center stage in April 2017 at the International Symposium on Digital Earth & Locate17 in Sydney, Australia.

A new national positioning system accurate to between 2-10 centimeters—as opposed to 5 meters with today’s satellite-based GPS—will boost Australia’s economy by $73 billion or more during the next 20 years, much of it in agriculture, said Dr. Peter Woodgate, CEO of the Cooperative Research Centre for Spatial Information (CRCSI).

“To adopt techniques like precision agriculture and controlled traffic farming, farmers need to be able to position equipment and sensors with about 5-centimeter accuracy,” noted Woodgate. “The conference will showcase space-based augmentation systems—including Australia and New Zealand’s joint initiative—which, subject to testing, are well on the way to achieving that.”

“Leveraging other regional efforts, such as a Japanese satellite-based system recently trialled in Queensland, it will be possible to remotely control unmanned autonomous vehicles like driverless tractors from space,” he added.

 

Next generation GPS, driverless tractors and the Internet of Things are expected to enable massive agriculture productivity growth and business opportunities.