Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
NASA maps Beirut explosion damage from space with satellites
A NASA team, using data from a European satellite...
DM adopts geospatial data in support of UN Sustainable Development Goals 2030
DUBAI - The Dubai Municipality has adopted the geospatial...
SpaceX launches 57 satellites for its Starlink network
The U.S. space company, SpaceX, on Friday launched 57...
Isro data from remote sensing satellites helped raise crop output: minister
The Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro)'s technology is no...
China is ready to challenge US domination in the world of navigation and mapping
Covid-19 may have left roads around the globe barren...
NASA research to be conducted at Rome drone test site
ROME, N.Y. – Oneida County has received nearly $900,000...
Nigeria signs MoU with India on space cooperation
Nigeria and the Indian Government have signed a Memorandum...
UAE celebrates 11th launch anniversary of DubaiSat-1
The UAE is celebrating the 11th anniversary of the...
UAE starts rush of missions to Mars looking for signs of life
A United Arab Emirates spacecraft has rocketed into space...
Turkey’s Lake Salda may yield answers for life on Mars
Similarities between a lake in southwestern Turkey and the...
figsydney100

Australia is expected to be hardest hit amongst developed nations by climate change because we are already living on the edge, in an extremely harsh environment. In this most ancient of lands, soils are impoverished, water holes are far apart and nutrients scarce.

This is why kangaroos hop. It is by the far the most efficient way of travelling because each bounce – like a pogo stick – gives impetus for the next. It is also why gum trees don’t drop their leaves because it takes too much effort to grow new ones.

It is also why koalas have a vacant expression and sleep a lot. The gum trees they feed on release toxins to discourage them from eating the leaves. Koalas have to expend a lot of energy getting rid of these toxins and so, since the brain demands a lot of energy, they have made the evolutionary choice to have small brains.

Over the next century the water in the oceans will get warmer and will expand. Sea levels will rise by 3mm per year around the world, but around Australia they are expected to rise by 8mm. Over the next century this means a rise of 1.1 meters, inundating or endangering over a quarter of a million homes. Schools, ports, hospitals and airports will be impacted.

Yet Australians, most of whom live in the more comfortable coastal fringe, are resistant to the concept of climate change. 8mm a year is still too small to be felt. Which brings us to Surveyors and land professionals because of our ability to measure and locate.

“You are custodians of enabling technology that can explain the consequences of these changes such as bio-diversity loss, the impact on food production and national boundaries”. Surveyors played a defining role in exploring and building modern Australia. Now, we must take on a new and equally active role. “We must start investing money and time now, so that we don’t leave our children with so big a problem that they don’t have the capacity to deal with it” said Flannery.

But his parting message was upbeat. “Go away energised and full of optimism for what you can deliver for a sustainable future”.

——————————————————

Jose Diacono is a columnist for Asian Surveying and Mapping based in Australia and works for Communica Marketing. www.communica.com.au