Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
NEA AND SLA SIGN MOU TO SHARE GLOBAL NAVIGATION SATELLITE SYSTEM (GNSS)-DERIVED MOISTURE DATA FOR WEATHER MONITORING APPLICATION
Singapore – The National Environment Agency (NEA) and the Singapore...
UAE to develop SAR satellite constellation for remote sensing
The UAE Space Agency, on Monday announced a new...
China launches new group of remote sensing satellites
XICHANG - China successfully launched a new group of...
Google Maps finally launches Street View in India, everything we know so far
15 years after it first launched, Google Maps finally...
GeoSLAM tech deployed on large-scale urbanisation project
GeoSLAM’s handheld LiDAR technology has been utilised to document...
ISRO Chief Reports Centre’s Intentions To Open Public-private Partnership To Strengthen Space Industry
ISRO chief S Somanath has said that the government...
China Launches A Global Naming Search For Its Newest Solar Observatory; Will Orbit Earth Every 90 Minutes
The Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has launched a...
SpaceX launches 46 satellites into low-Earth orbit
SpaceX launched the most recent set of 46 Starlink...
Isro launches GISAT-1 satellite, says mission could not be ‘fully’ accomplished
The satellite was launched on a geosynchronous satellite launch...
Franco-Japanese Space Cooperation Focused on Exploration, Earth Observation and Next-gen Launchers
PARIS — The week of June 27, 2022, on the...

April 13th, 2017
National Trust Deploys Laser Survey Aircraft from Bluesky to Map in 3D

The UK’s National Trust has turned to aerial laser mapping to create accurate 3D models of the Dudmaston Hall estate in Shropshire. Working with aerial mapping company Bluesky, the Trust plans to improve access to the historically and culturally important estate. Measurements captured using aircraft mounted lasers have been used to create the 3D visualisations of the 17th century country mansion estate and woodland areas. The Bluesky laser data, known as LiDAR, is now being used to underpin and inform other survey activities, and allow for improved access to the estate through the design and creation of additional walking and cycling routes.

“We are always looking to improve the visitor experience at our properties through new attractions and better access to existing facilities,” commented Sue Briggs, Outdoors Project Manager for the National Trust at Dudmaston. “While we had some aerial survey images of the main hall and gardens, much of the estate was previously unmapped. Working with Bluesky to capture the LiDAR and create detailed 3D visualisations, we now have a much better understanding of the topography of the site.

“The Bluesky LiDAR data is already helping us plot routes through the woodland area for improved access by walkers and cyclists, and is underpinning other activities including an historical landscape survey and archaeological study.”

Bluesky undertook the LiDAR survey in November 2016 in accordance with tight project deadlines and uncertain weather conditions. The resulting 16 ppm (points per metre) data was delivered to the client for use at both a local level and also in the main National Trust GIS and mapping systems by specialist staff and stakeholders.

Dudmaston Hall is a traditional example of a country estate comprising a late-17th century mansion, landscaped gardens, parkland, managed woodland, lakeside and farmland. Dudmaston also includes the nearby village of Quatt, a model village designed by London architect John Birch for the workers and tenants of the estate.

Today Dudmaston Hall estate contains an outstanding art collection, described as ‘one of Britain’s most important public collections of modern art’, including sculptures by Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth, plus an extensive collection of mid-20th century Spanish paintings and pottery.