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August 30th, 2011
Campbell Scientific Wireless Infrared Radiometer

A wireless sensor can route its transmissions through up to three other wireless sensors. A datalogger is connected to the CWB100A base station for processing and storing the CWS220A’s data.

The CWS220A provides a non-contact means of measuring the surface temperature of an object or surface by sensing the infrared radiation given off by the subject. It is comprised of a thermopile, which measures surface temperature, and a thermistor, which measures sensor body temperature. The two temperature probes are housed in a rugged aluminum body that contains a germanium window.

Why Wireless?

There are situations when it is desirable to make measurements in locations where the use of cabled sensors is problematic. Protecting cables by running them through conduit or burying them in trenches is time consuming, labor intensive, and sometimes not possible. Local fire codes may preclude the use of certain types of sensor cabling inside of buildings. In some applications measurements need to be made at distances where long cables decrease the quality of the measurement or are too expensive. There are also times when it is important to increase the number of measurements being made but the datalogger does not have enough available channels left for attaching additional sensor cables. Read More