Asian Surveying & Mapping
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Chinese academy takes step to bolster agriculture in Zambia
LUSAKA, June 21 (Xinhua) -- The Chinese Academy of...
South Korea, Japan to Plus-Up Position, Navigation, and Timing Satellite Systems
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Hong Kong IoT Conference 2019 Connected World Connected Business – Introducing New Solutions and Course to Construct IoT Ecosystem
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March 19th, 2014
Ocean-Current Maps Could Help Us Find the Malaysia Airlines Plane

Over the weekend, the search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 widened to include thousands of miles of the southern Indian Ocean along with most of central Asia. The plane was last pinpointed by military radar 200 miles off the western coast of Malaysia on the traditional flight path toward Europe, but no country since has reported spotting MH370 in its airspace. For all the attention focused on radar, though, another monitoring system could eventually prove more important in finding the missing plane. If indeed the plane crashed in the ocean and some debris turns up, then authorities may be able to locate the site of the crash and the plane’s remains using one of the state-of-the-art models created by oceanographers to map ocean currents. Read More