Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
European aerial surveying industry gathered at the 2022 EAASI Summit
More than 70 members of the aerial mapping industry...
China releases report on remote sensing monitoring for global ecology
BEIJING - China's Ministry of Science and Technology issued...
Singapore launches Environmental Services Industry Transformation Map, to create more than 1,600 PMET jobs by 2025
With a total of 23 Industry Transformation Maps to be...
China builds new dam in Tibet near Indian border
In a development that is a matter of concern...
Abu Dhabi’s Bayanat more than doubles 2022 net profit on revenue boost
Bayanat, a geospatial data products and services provider which listed...
Esri India Inks MoU with TEXMiN – IIT (ISM) Dhanbad
Esri India, the country’s leading Geographic Information System (GIS)...
China forms all-weather remote sensing monitoring system for all waters, islands: top aerospace authorities
China’s space technology was deeply applied in the country’s...
EU and Japan to improve Earth observation data through Copernicus
As part of a recent agreement, Japan will provide...
Indonesia deploys first student satellite through KiboCUBE programme
VIENNA - Indonesia has successfully deployed its first student...
Joshimath Crisis: ISRO Satellite Images, Reports Show How the Entire Town is at the Brink of Collapse
An eerie silence prevails over the small town of...

July 19th, 2013
Borneo Forest Degradation Impacts 80% of the Land

The Malaysian states of Sabah and Sarawak are global hotspots of forest loss and degradation due to timber and oil palm industries; however, the rates and patterns of change have remained poorly measured by conventional field or satellite approaches. Using 30 m resolution optical imagery acquired since 1990, forest cover and logging roads were mapped throughout Malaysian Borneo and Brunei using the Carnegie Landsat Analysis System. We uncovered ~364,000 km of roads constructed through the forests of this region. We estimated that in 2009 there were at most 45,400 km2 of intact forest ecosystems in Malaysian Borneo and Brunei. Critically, we found that nearly 80% of the land surface of Sabah and Sarawak was impacted by previously undocumented, high-impact logging or clearing operations from 1990 to 2009. This contrasted strongly with neighbouring Brunei, where 54% of the land area remained covered by unlogged forest. Overall, only 8% and 3% of land area in Sabah and Sarawak, respectively, was covered by intact forests under designated protected areas. Our assessment shows that very few forest ecosystems remain intact in Sabah or Sarawak, but that Brunei, by largely excluding industrial logging from its borders, has been comparatively successful in protecting its forests.

Read the full paper in PLOS One.