Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
AMH Philippines and Synspective sign MoU for Strategic Alliance to use SAR Data for Geohazard Mitigation Projects in the Philippines
AMH Philippines, Inc. and Synspective have signed a Memorandum...
Australian spacetech companies partner to deliver the world’s first on-demand satellite imaging platform.
Over the course of several decades, satellite imagery has...
Singapore boosts geospatial property collaboration
The Singapore Land Authority (SLA) has signed memoranda of...
Esri India partners with AGNIi (Invest India) to roll-out ‘GeoInnovation’
Empowering start-ups to build location Intelligence and facilitate wider...
‘ISRO gearing up for multiple space missions in 2022’
After a rather muted 2021 in terms of satellite...
Australian company develops system for real time mapping of wildfires
At Wildfire Today we have often advocated for what...
Israel awards nearly $6 million in grants to space tech startups
From growing super-vegetables in space to taking high-resolution images...
Modi Govt’s ‘Urban Geospatial Data Stories Challenge’ To Promote Innovation Begins
The Union Housing and Urban Affairs Ministry said that...
Ethiopian Government to Merge the Ethiopian Space Science and Technology Institute and Ethiopian Geospatial Information Institute
In November 2021, the Ethiopian House of People’s Representatives...
Iran Slaps Down US ‘Concerns’ Over Space Programme After Satellite Launch
Iran launched a rocket carrying three satellites into space...

July 19th, 2013
Borneo Forest Degradation Impacts 80% of the Land

The Malaysian states of Sabah and Sarawak are global hotspots of forest loss and degradation due to timber and oil palm industries; however, the rates and patterns of change have remained poorly measured by conventional field or satellite approaches. Using 30 m resolution optical imagery acquired since 1990, forest cover and logging roads were mapped throughout Malaysian Borneo and Brunei using the Carnegie Landsat Analysis System. We uncovered ~364,000 km of roads constructed through the forests of this region. We estimated that in 2009 there were at most 45,400 km2 of intact forest ecosystems in Malaysian Borneo and Brunei. Critically, we found that nearly 80% of the land surface of Sabah and Sarawak was impacted by previously undocumented, high-impact logging or clearing operations from 1990 to 2009. This contrasted strongly with neighbouring Brunei, where 54% of the land area remained covered by unlogged forest. Overall, only 8% and 3% of land area in Sabah and Sarawak, respectively, was covered by intact forests under designated protected areas. Our assessment shows that very few forest ecosystems remain intact in Sabah or Sarawak, but that Brunei, by largely excluding industrial logging from its borders, has been comparatively successful in protecting its forests.

Read the full paper in PLOS One.