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Space Foundation Signs MOU with UAE’s Al Suwaidi Private Office & Group
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Abu Dhabi, UAE — — Space...
Seven HKU young scientists awarded China’s Excellent Young Scientists Fund 2020
Young researchers at the University of Hong Kong have...
Launch Of South Korean CAS500-1 Satellite Delayed Until 2021
MOSCOW - The launch of South Korean CAS500-1 (Compact Advanced Satellite...
India, US likely to ink geospatial intelligence pact ahead of November 3 presidential election
The last high-level engagement between New Delhi and Donald...
Dubai Police Select Draganfly to Pilot New Drone Initiatives
Los Angeles, California - Draganfly Inc. (OTCQB: DFLYF) (CSE:...
EU and China sign landmark agreement protecting European Geographical Indications
Today, the EU and China signed a bilateral agreement...
China’s optical remote sensing satellite fails to enter pre-set orbit
China has declared the Kuaizhou-1A rocket mission a failure...
Life on Venus? Isro’s Shukrayaan-1 mission in race to the fiery planet
Astronomers on Monday said they have found a potential...
Japanese City Using GIS on iPads for Field Survey
The City of Tamba in Hyogo prefecture, Japan, performs...
China launches new optical remote-sensing satellite
China launched a new optical remote-sensing satellite from the...

June 6th, 2011
Conserving a Connected World

We live in a beautiful, strangely connected world. A world where an Argus pheasant dancing in the under-storey of a Malaysian rainforest is linked by logging and timber trade to furniture in households in Coimbatore or Delhi. A world where an orang-utan sleeping in its canopy nest in the rainforests of Indonesian Kalimantan is linked precariously to bars of chocolate and soap in Europe and cheap palm oil in Indian markets. It’s a world where a person buying a packet of Indian coffee or tea anywhere is inextricably linked to hornbills and rivers, to threatened macaques and elephants of the forests and grasslands of the Western Ghats, Assam, or Darjeeling. In today’s world, although perhaps unintended by the ultimate consumer, a purchase of a cell phone or laptop carrying coltan ore could signify slamming the door on equatorial forests and endangered gorillas of the Congo. Read More