Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
Bricsys’ local partner, ACA Pacific, selected by Singapore government as Productivity Solutions Grant (PSG) vendor
The partnership will enable Singaporean companies to access the...
MapmyIndia joins hands with ISRO to boost 3D mapping
Homegrown navigation firm MapmyIndia on Friday said it has...
ISRO and Pataa to develop satellite image-based digital addresses
Bengaluru: Pataa Navigations and Indian National Space Promotion and Authorisation...
Esri UK launches careers resources to inspire more students to study geography and GIS
Esri UK today announced a new Careers with GIS...
Southeast Asia’s Grab to offer mapping services to other firms in search for profit
(Reuters) - Grab Holdings Ltd said on Wednesday it...
Hancom launches S. Korea’s 1st commercial Earth observation satellite
SEOUL - A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifted off...
Chinese Automaker Launches Nine Satellites to Aid Self-Driving Cars
China’s Zhejiang Geely Holding Group unveiled the first nine...
NASA team in India to discuss on joint mission ‘NISAR’ with ISRO; launch likely by Q1 2023
A visiting delegation from the American Space Agency (NASA)...
South Korea Embarks On Domestic UAS Development
SEOUL—South Korea’s Agency for Defense Development (ADD) has confirmed...
Australian 5G Innovation Initiative SkyLink UTM Trials
The 5G UTM trial is part of an overall...

April 14th, 2014
Real-time Mapping Can Tighten Australia’s Ports

Mr Bills said the same approach could enable Australian port authorities to crack down on drug trafficking and other crime by tracking suspicious behaviour, such as irregular vessel berths.

“Ports are highly dynamic environments which contain a number of information sources such as CCTV footage, ground-based radar and vessel tracking systems,” Mr Bills said.

“GIS technology integrates these data feeds into a real-time, common operating picture of the entire facility.

“This means security officers can track the location and movements of personnel, equipment, shipping containers, vehicles and maritime and terrestrial traffic – all on one screen.

“The Port of Long Beach has used this technology to quickly identify unusual occurrences and movements – for example, the arrival of an unexpected ship.

“By adding further information, such as the vessel’s specifications, potential cargo and origin, officers can drill down to identify anomalies which indicate a potential threat.

“Furthermore, GIS technology can also map and identify security blackspots to enable authorities to put preventative security measures in place.”
    
While in the country, Mr Bills will meet with security agencies in partnership with his Australian counterpart David Eastman – a national security expert at Esri Australia.

Mr Eastman said GIS is key to tightening the nation’s port security operations and management.

“While GIS technology is already employed extensively in many of the world’s leading port security operations – such as Port of Los Angeles and Port of Rotterdam – its use in Australia is still relatively new,” Mr Eastman said.  
 
“However, the technology should be an integral component of every country’s customs and border protection services.

“It enables officers to be more predictive in their approach to security, and identify suspicious activities long before it becomes an issue.

Mr Eastman said the technology’s scalability meant Australian agencies could develop and share national, state and local views of its widely-spread facilities – including airports.

“This ability to see the whole picture, while also having the capability to focus on a smaller area, gives national security agencies a distinct strategic advantage,” Mr Eastman said.  

“In terms of interagency coordination, customs, coast guard, maritime police, security officials and operations personnel can seamlessly integrate their data to create a complete port security picture.

“When everyone is working from the same map, port security operations become far more efficient and effective.”