Asian Surveying & Mapping
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April 26th, 2016
Indonesian Peat Prize Mapping Method Contest Closes Soon

The Indonesian Peat Prize, which will award $1 million, will be closing soon. The Indonesian Peat Prize is an ambitious, collaborative prize for finding a more accurate, faster and affordable method of mapping the extent and thickness of Indonesian peatlands. A $1 million prize purse will be awarded to the winning team along with their invaluable contributions to establishing a better national standard for mapping peatlands in Indonesia.

The goal of the Indonesian Peat Prize is not to make a perfect map of peatland, but to quickly find the most useful technology and methodology (solution) possible for mapping. Usefulness is determined by the degree to which a map is accurate, affordable and quick to create. A successful prize will identify a transparent, credible and location-agnostic methodology for mapping Indonesian peatland extent and thickness.

Students, engineers, consultants, product directors, scientists, research institutions, companies, universities, civil society organizations, non-governmental organizations—anyone with a great idea who meets the criteria is invited to join. People or teams from around the world can join forces with Indonesian partners.

The prize is co-hosted by the Indonesian Geospatial Information Agency (BIG) and the Packard Foundation. For more detailed information on the prize and how teams can register, please visit www.indonesianpeatprize.com.