Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
Vietnam Launches Climate-Smart Maps and Adaptation Plans
To help farmers manage climate-related risks such as flooding,...
NZ Spatial Excellence Awards finalists announced
The list of the finalists for the 2021 NZ...
Woolpert Acquires Australasian Geospatial Leader AAM
Woolpert has acquired AAM, a global geospatial services company...
ISRO Invites Online Applications For Remote Sensing And Image Analysis Course
ISRO will train 20 students in offline mode on...
NITI Aayog releases geospatial energy map of India
NITI Aayog has released a new map that attempts...
GSSI Ground Penetrating Radar Equipment Used in Mount Everest Measurement Expedition
GSSI, the world’s leading manufacturer of ground penetrating radar...
European commercial drone developer FIXAR enters the Indian market with Paras Aerospace
EU-based commercial drone design and software developer FIXAR, has...
United Arab Emirates to launch bold asteroid mission in 2028
The United Arab Emirates (UAE) has set its sights...
WAFA: “Work of Palestinian land surveyors in Masafer Yatta interrupted by Israeli settlers”s”
HEBRON – Extremist Israeli settlers attacked a number of...
Ola acquires geospatial company GeoSpoc
Ola has acquired GeoSpoc, a six-year-old Pune-based geospatial company....
tea plucking 0

 The peak years for tea plantations is between twenty and four years, and most of India’s tea plantation are more than sixty years old. The age of plants, depletion of soil and entrenched pests all contribute. With remote sensing, plantation owners are seeking to better monitor their crop, understanding the chmistry and aiming to nurture the plants back to peak productivity.

Using multispectral imagery and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) that is a visual indication of plant health, plantations are being profiled. NDVI reveals different chemical components in the tea leaves. Researchers are using imagery from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) aboard NASA’s Terra satellite. The regular data collection from the satellite source allows the researchers to capture leaf conditions throughout the seasons.

By comparing the chemistry of the processed leaves with the NDVI analysis of the plantation fields, researchers found that they could use remote sensing to detect the changes in caffeine, catechins, and various theaflavins that influenced a tea’s appearance and flavor. Remote sensing could reduce the amount of hand sampling in the field by monitoring the desired leaf qualities across large sections of tea destined to be harvested.

Applying remote sensing allows plantation managers to track tea quality and plant growth, and is one more tool they can use to reduce costs and remain competitive. 

Read the full story here.