Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
GSSI Ground Penetrating Radar Equipment Used in Mount Everest Measurement Expedition
GSSI, the world’s leading manufacturer of ground penetrating radar...
European commercial drone developer FIXAR enters the Indian market with Paras Aerospace
EU-based commercial drone design and software developer FIXAR, has...
United Arab Emirates to launch bold asteroid mission in 2028
The United Arab Emirates (UAE) has set its sights...
WAFA: “Work of Palestinian land surveyors in Masafer Yatta interrupted by Israeli settlers”s”
HEBRON – Extremist Israeli settlers attacked a number of...
Ola acquires geospatial company GeoSpoc
Ola has acquired GeoSpoc, a six-year-old Pune-based geospatial company....
New UAE space mission will orbit Venus and land on an asteroid
The United Arab Emirates is setting a course for...
Britain’s space programme has been hit by Brexit, with FIVE concerns to be resolved before launch.
BREXIT BRITAIN’S SPACE STRATEGY has been slammed, with this...
Nobel Prize for physics winner shaped ground-breaking Earth-observing mission
This year's Nobel Prize in Physics laureate Klaus Hasselmann...
China deepens application use for BeiDou technology to build an integrated industrial ecosystem
As China has continuously deepened the application of the...
PM Modi launches India’s first private space association
New Delhi: India will soon have policies on space communication...
qi wall2

The Qi Wall has been tracked across more than 50 km, with remnants of its rammed earth remains visible and traceable. This mapped portion is estimated to be only 1/12th of its full extent.

The wall follows contours of the terrain, sticking to ridges to retain the highest elevation possible. Worker would have carried soil to the tops of these ridges and pounded the earth along with water to achieve heights as great as 15 feet.

The mapping effort is led by Gary Feinman, Curator of Anthropology at the Field Museum, and Professor Fang Hui of Shandong University. The Sino-American team is meticulously documenting both the path of this early great wall and recording its long-term relationship to settlement patterns in the region.

“This was a major effort, because the wall follows ridges into mountainous areas that would have been very difficult to reach with great volumes of earth,” Feinman said.  Today, the wall is best preserved at these higher elevations where it likely was most difficult to erect, but where it is not endangered by subsequent farming and flooding.

The wall would have been effective in slowing down large infantries that would have needed to scale it, dragging carts and supplies, in order to cross into disputed territory.

Source: Field Museum