Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
GSSI Ground Penetrating Radar Equipment Used in Mount Everest Measurement Expedition
GSSI, the world’s leading manufacturer of ground penetrating radar...
European commercial drone developer FIXAR enters the Indian market with Paras Aerospace
EU-based commercial drone design and software developer FIXAR, has...
United Arab Emirates to launch bold asteroid mission in 2028
The United Arab Emirates (UAE) has set its sights...
WAFA: “Work of Palestinian land surveyors in Masafer Yatta interrupted by Israeli settlers”s”
HEBRON – Extremist Israeli settlers attacked a number of...
Ola acquires geospatial company GeoSpoc
Ola has acquired GeoSpoc, a six-year-old Pune-based geospatial company....
New UAE space mission will orbit Venus and land on an asteroid
The United Arab Emirates is setting a course for...
Britain’s space programme has been hit by Brexit, with FIVE concerns to be resolved before launch.
BREXIT BRITAIN’S SPACE STRATEGY has been slammed, with this...
Nobel Prize for physics winner shaped ground-breaking Earth-observing mission
This year's Nobel Prize in Physics laureate Klaus Hasselmann...
China deepens application use for BeiDou technology to build an integrated industrial ecosystem
As China has continuously deepened the application of the...
PM Modi launches India’s first private space association
New Delhi: India will soon have policies on space communication...
mapkecil04

The goal is to develop rural space plans that are more equitable and participatory, with financial instruments that help locals. The public policy reform aims for environmental protection and better resource management. The financial compensation is tied to payment for environmental services and such approaches as Reducing Environmental Deforestation and Degredation (REDD).

The project works at the district scale for planning, but also at the village level in order to engage local communities. In the past the mediation for land use allocation for resource exploitation has often cut out locals due to weak land tenure laws. With this new approach, local communities become involved to avoid environmental degredation, strengthen land tenue, and integrate stakeholder views.

Policymakers are realizing that mining, agriculture and oil palm plantations are increasingly inevitable as the pace of economic growth in the country increases. The participatory approach has been embraced by decision makers in West Kalimantan as a means to make the most of this growth, with a shared vision, rather than exploitation.

Inclusive spatial planning answers questions about how much land is needed for nature conservation, agricultural development, forestry and mining. With stakeholder consensus, through workshops and other stakeholder engagement, the public understands the need for a broad vision and a consensus focus so that they achieve their desired future.

Project staff have created two regency-wide spatial databases with six map layers that are at a 1:50,000 scale. The data includes environmental data and land use recommendations. Livelihood data is added to understand how locals make their living. There are 40 people from various NGOs involved in collecting this data and assisting with land use planning.

The planning aims to take a new approach, rather than a top-down government approach that bypasses local input or benefit. Through the process, a common vision is achieved along with land-use maps that are detailed to drive policy and resolve such issues as boundary disputes, land ownership and access to forest resources. The access and sharing of information is key to the ongoing success.

Sources: CIRAD, CoLUPSIA, Trust.org