Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
Plans Unveiled To Better Connect Space Industries In Scotland And The UAE
Edinburgh, Dubai - Globally focused strategic space marketing firm...
UAE, Rwanda sign economic and technical cooperation agreement
Sheikh Shakhboot Bin Nahyan Bin Mubarak Al Nahyan, Minister...
XAG promotes drones in Vietnam to boost rice farming while cutting fertilizer use
CAO LANH, Vietnam - As the monsoon season starts...
China launches first bipolar GNSS-R ocean survey payload
China's first satellite-carried bipolar ocean survey payload supported by...
Ethiopian Space Technology and Geospatial Institute Gets new Director
Mr Abdisa Yilma has been appointed as the Director...
Cheng Zhang 2D launches from Taiyuan with Jilin-1 satellites
A Cheng Zhang 2D (also known as the Long...
Government of Umm Al Quwain gains greater efficiency and economy with move to BricsCAD
The Urban Planning Department of the Government of Umm...
New Cabinet Office project will expand the use of SAR satellites
Synspective enters into contract for "demonstration project for expanding...
Russia and China are working on a space cooperation program for 2023-2028
Russia and China are working on a five-year space...
China launches remote sensing on crops to forecast production and ensure food safety
Chinese meteorologists launched monitoring and assessment services for winter...
cholera

Through gene sequencing and mapping of 154 patients across the world over 40 years, studying single DNA changes, researchers were able to track the strain of bacteria back to its origin in Bangladesh. This strain became drug resistant in 1982, which renewed it global transmission and impact.

The new research examines the role of modern travel in transmitting the bacteria, as well as the importance of the Gulf of Bengal as a renewing source from which the bacteria can be transmitted. The global spread of this same strain has reached Africa, South Asia and South America.

According to the report, “the evidence suggests that there have been at least three independent overlapping waves of intercontinental spread with a common ancestor in the 1950s, representing the original El Tor strain. These movements are strongly correlated with human activity, suggesting that the strain has been carried by human travel.”

Prior to this research that have pinpointed the origin, it was believed that cholera always rose from a local strain that became active due to poor sanitary conditions. This study illustrates the powerful combination of genomic research and mapping technologies to display our interconnected pathways for disease to spread quickly. Given this impact, more research and resources will likely be brought to bear on pandemic tracking and abatement in the future.

The full report was published and is available from the journal Nature.

 

 

 

 

Read more about this public health story via this Sanger Institute press release.