Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
SpaceX Gets U.S. Regulator to Back Satellite Internet Plan
Elon Musk's SpaceX, fresh off the successful launch this...
UK’s Surrey Satellite to Lease Earth Observation Satellite to China’s 21AT
Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL), located in Guildford, Surrey,...
Russia’s Remote Sensing Satellites Send First Earth Images
MOSCOW- Russia’s remote sensing satellites Kanopus No. 3 and...
US Air Force Announces Plans to Launch a New, Hardend GPS Satellite Constellation SOFREP Original Content
Billions of people around the globe utilize GPS as...
India Tapping Satellite Technology to Improve Weather Warning, Fishing Aid Systems
Indian Secretary of the Department of Agricultural Research and...
Russia and China are Developing ‘Destructive’ Space Weapons, US Intelligence Warns
Within the next few years, Moscow and Beijing could...
Google Earth Outreach to Enable Mapping Tools for Indian NGOs
India: In a bid to leverage Google’s mapping tools...
Emirates SkyCargo Transports First Space Satellite to South Korea
February 2018: Emirates SkyCargo, the freight division of Emirates...
China Launches 2 More BeiDou Satellites into Space
Earlier this week, China launched a pair of BeiDou-3...
Scientists Directly Observe for the First Time a Shower of Electrons Bouncing Across Earth’s Magnetic Field
Scientists have, for the first time, directly observed the...

Researchers from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) recently discovered that infrared satellite data could be used to predict when lava flow-forming eruptions will end.

Using NASA satellite data, Estelle Bonny, a graduate student in the SOEST Department of Geology and Geophysics, and her mentor, Hawaiʻi Institute for Geophysics and Planetology (HIGP) researcher Robert Wright, tested a hypothesis first published in 1981 that detailed how lava flow rate changes during a typical effusive volcanic eruption. The model predicted that once a lava flow-forming eruption begins, the rate at which lava exits the vent quickly rises to a peak and then reduces to zero over a much longer period of time—when the rate reaches zero, the eruption has ended.

Once peak flow was reached, the researchers determined where the volcano was along the predicted curve of decreasing flow and therefore predict when the eruption will end. While the model has been around for decades, this is the first time satellite data was used to test how useful this approach is for predicting the end of an effusive eruption. The test was successful.

“Being able to predict the end of a lava flow-forming eruption is really important, because it will greatly reduce the disturbance caused to those affected by the eruption, for example, those who live close to the volcano and have been evacuated,” said Bonny.

“This study is potentially relevant for the Hawaiʻi Island and its active volcanoes,” said Wright. “A future eruption of Mauna Loa may be expected to display the kind of pattern of lava discharge rate that would allow us to use this method to try to predict the end of eruption from space.”