Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
SpaceX Gets U.S. Regulator to Back Satellite Internet Plan
Elon Musk's SpaceX, fresh off the successful launch this...
UK’s Surrey Satellite to Lease Earth Observation Satellite to China’s 21AT
Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL), located in Guildford, Surrey,...
Russia’s Remote Sensing Satellites Send First Earth Images
MOSCOW- Russia’s remote sensing satellites Kanopus No. 3 and...
US Air Force Announces Plans to Launch a New, Hardend GPS Satellite Constellation SOFREP Original Content
Billions of people around the globe utilize GPS as...
India Tapping Satellite Technology to Improve Weather Warning, Fishing Aid Systems
Indian Secretary of the Department of Agricultural Research and...
Russia and China are Developing ‘Destructive’ Space Weapons, US Intelligence Warns
Within the next few years, Moscow and Beijing could...
Google Earth Outreach to Enable Mapping Tools for Indian NGOs
India: In a bid to leverage Google’s mapping tools...
Emirates SkyCargo Transports First Space Satellite to South Korea
February 2018: Emirates SkyCargo, the freight division of Emirates...
China Launches 2 More BeiDou Satellites into Space
Earlier this week, China launched a pair of BeiDou-3...
Scientists Directly Observe for the First Time a Shower of Electrons Bouncing Across Earth’s Magnetic Field
Scientists have, for the first time, directly observed the...

Scientists in New Zealand are using high-resolution images from DigitalGlobe’s  WorldView-3 satellite to gauge the numbers of Northern Royal albatrosses, an endangered animal that nests almost exclusively on some rocky sea-stacks close to New Zealand’s Chatham Islands.

The audit, led by experts at the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), represents the first time any species on Earth has had its entire global population assessed from orbit. The scientists report the satellite technique in Ibis, a journal of the British Ornithologists’ Union, and It’s likely to have a major impact on efforts to conserve the Northern Royals (Diomedea sanfordi).

Ordinarily, these birds are very difficult to appraise because their nesting sites are so inaccessible. Not only are the sea-stacks far from New Zealand (680 kilometers), but their vertical cliffs mean that any visiting scientist might also have to be adept at rock climbing.

“Getting the people, ships or planes to these islands to count the birds is expensive, but it can be very dangerous as well,” explained Peter Fretwell from BAS.

This makes the WorldView-3 satellite something of a breakthrough. It can acquire pictures of Earth that capture features as small as 30 centimeters across. With a body length of more than a meter, the adult albatrosses only show up as two or three pixels, but their white plumage makes them stand out against the surrounding vegetation. The BAS team literally counts the dots.

Click here for more information.

 

DigitalGlobe’s WorldView-3 satellite can see the nesting Northern Royal albatrosses as they sit on eggs to incubate them or as they guard newly hatched chicks.