Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
China Launch New Satellite into Space to ‘Spy on Earth’ in Bid to Match US Military
The move comes as China looks to expand its...
Google Maps Back in China After Eight Years
Google has set up a China-specific version of the...
Indian Launch for British Colour Video Earth Observation Prototype
The satellite, known as CARBONITE-2 by its builder, Surrey...
India Launches 31 Satellites in Single Mission
NEW DELHI - India Friday launched 31 satellites in...
Pakistan Alleges India Using Satellites for Military Purposes
Islamabad- Pakistan on Thursday alleged that India's plan to...
1Spatial Wins USD766,000 US Contract For Geographic Information System
LONDON  - Geospatial software and solutions company 1Spatial PLC...
Baidu Unveils Apollo 2.0 at CES 2018: More Mapping, More Test Drives, and Udacity Partnership
Baidu just announced the second version of its Apollo...
First Chinese launch of 2018 puts two SuperView-1 observation satellites into low Earth orbit
China on Tuesday carried out its first launch of...
Indian Railways to Deploy Drones for Project Monitoring
India: The Indian Railways has decided to deploy drones...
Joint Venture With Japan Could Yield Connectivity Through High-Altitude, Solar-Powered Drone
A high-altitude pseudo-satellite (HAPS) is a category of unmanned...

An 800-year-old puzzle about the burial place of Mongolian ruler Genghis Khan sparked a very 21st century business. Albert Lin was on an expedition to locate the lost tomb of the Mongol Empire founder, when satellite imagery firm DigitalGlobe donated some photos of potential areas for his team to scrutinise.

These images, taken from space, were enormous, and as nobody knows what the tomb actually looked like, there was no obvious place to start the search.

So the team decided to crowdsource for clues. They returned to Mongolia three times to investigate “anomalies” in the photographs, submitted by eagle-eyed armchair enthusiasts. Could one of these have been the burial site?

Alas, no, the search continues. But one of the team members, Shay Har-Noy, says: “We did find some ancient archaeological sites that are still in need of investigation.”

The experience inspired them to set up crowdsourcing platform Tomnod, which offered satellite imagery from DigitalGlobe to people running their own projects. DigitalGlobe eventually acquired the firm.

Among many other applications, shortwave infrared satellite imagery can help miners search for minerals. (Credit: DigitalGlobe)