Asian Surveying & Mapping
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DigitalGlobe Announces Four-Year Direct Access Contract with the Australian Department of Defence for Real-time Access to the World’s Highest-Resolution Commercial Satellite Imagery
WESTMINSTER, Colo. - DigitalGlobe, Inc. (NYSE: DGI), the global...
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ISRO to Develop Full-Fledged Hyperspectral Imaging Satellite
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Australia Farewells Heron UAS Capability
Australia initially leased the Heron unmanned aerial system (UAS) to fill a capability...
South Korea Developing Earth-Based Navigation System to Protect Ships from Cyber Attacks
Reuters reported that South Korea has begun the development...
India Eyes Big Business with Africa in Space Exploration
The recent foray of Ghana into space exploration provides...
ISRO Conducts Workshop on Geospatial Information, Remote Sensing
A workshop on "Popularisation of Remote Sensing based maps...
China Blocks info on River Water Inflow, Raises Hackles
At a time when major rivers in Himachal Pradesh...
After ISRO Launches its Satellite Successfully, Chile Looks to Work with IIT
Cheaper and credible launches and India’s overall expertise is...
EXCLUSIVE – Congressional Expert: North Korea Satellites Orbiting U.S. Could Be Used for ‘Surprise’ EMP Attack
While the news media and U.S. intelligence community continues...

An 800-year-old puzzle about the burial place of Mongolian ruler Genghis Khan sparked a very 21st century business. Albert Lin was on an expedition to locate the lost tomb of the Mongol Empire founder, when satellite imagery firm DigitalGlobe donated some photos of potential areas for his team to scrutinise.

These images, taken from space, were enormous, and as nobody knows what the tomb actually looked like, there was no obvious place to start the search.

So the team decided to crowdsource for clues. They returned to Mongolia three times to investigate “anomalies” in the photographs, submitted by eagle-eyed armchair enthusiasts. Could one of these have been the burial site?

Alas, no, the search continues. But one of the team members, Shay Har-Noy, says: “We did find some ancient archaeological sites that are still in need of investigation.”

The experience inspired them to set up crowdsourcing platform Tomnod, which offered satellite imagery from DigitalGlobe to people running their own projects. DigitalGlobe eventually acquired the firm.

Among many other applications, shortwave infrared satellite imagery can help miners search for minerals. (Credit: DigitalGlobe)