Asian Surveying & Mapping
Breaking News
Post-Failed Mission, Isro to ‘Resume Satellite Launches by December
NEW DELHI: After suffering a setback because of the...
China’s BeiDou Navigation Satellite System Gets Powerful Chip to Improve Positioning
A new powerful chip technology has been introduced in...
ISRO to Resume Satellite Launches by December Post Report on Failed Mission
The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) will resume its...
Vietnam, Japan Reach Deal on Satellite Data Exchange
NDO – The Vietnam National Space Center (VNSC), under...
Morocco to Host 7th Digital Earth Summit to Discuss Earth Observation
RABAT (Xinhua) - The seventh Digital Earth Summit will...
3rd Edition of State of Map Asia in Kathmandu
KATHMANDU, Sept 18: State of the Map Asia 2017 is...
India, Afghanistan to Cooperate in Space Technology
India will widen cooperation with Afghanistan in space technology...
ICIMOD Awarded Asia Geospatial Leadership Award
The International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) has...
India to Help Afghanistan in Space Technology and Security Forces
After the 2nd Strategic Partnership Council Meeting, a joint...
Drones Take on Increasingly Important Role in Land, Infrastructure, and Property Development
Drones are changing the face of construction, making land,...

Indonesia has the world’s greatest at-risk population for volcano hazards and is the most volcanically active nation on Earth. To help mitigate potential disasters to its country and people, the Indonesian Center for Volcanology and Geologic Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM) has been receiving assistance from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP) to help improve its volcano monitoring.

“VDAP revolutionized volcano monitoring in Indonesia,” said Raden Sukhyar, former director of the Indonesian Geological Agency.

VDAP is the only international volcano crisis response team that rapidly deploys experts, donates and installs monitoring equipment, and works with international counterparts to keep eruptions from becoming disasters. VDAP supports in-country scientists and agencies at the host country’s request, providing in-person training in Indonesia and the United States.

“Given the high population in Indonesia and the numerous active and potentially deadly volcanoes in the country, we are always concerned that an eruption can have a significant impact on at-risk populations,” said Gari Mayberry, the USGS-USAID geoscience advisor.

VDAP provided satellite radar data that were especially helpful in 2010, allowing observers to “see through” clouds that obscured Mount Merapi, which erupted violently that year after the partnership allowed more than 70,000 people to be safely evacuated. Other VDAP projects include improving monitoring networks in the archipelago islands and setting up a new regional volcano observatory in North Sulawesi.

VDAP and Indonesian officials observe a small collapse at the summit of Mount Merapi that produced rock fall and ash in 2006, years before the volcano explosively erupted. (Credit: Indonesian CVGHM)